My Latest Best Idea Ever.

September 30, 2009

So, after filling about 9 pages of my new notebook in a day… I’ve decided to start a webcomic.  The premise: “a noir tale of  literary insomnia, madness, and adventure.”  The cast: myself and my good friend Kyle as represented by a pair of characters we have coauthored in stories of high adventure since high school – Gate and Kai.  Presumably, we will be facing foes from literature and history, along with characters from our own writings – while at the same time battling our ever deepening madness.  Anyhow, Kyle will be helping me write the panels.  For now, enjoy the two character sketches I have made.

Listening to: Pyramid Song, Radiohead

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Webcomic!

September 30, 2009
In Dreams Darkly
My friend Ian gifted me a graphing notebook today.  It’s amazing how perception changes based upon the medium used to create.  Apparently graphing paper yields doodles, and so I thought I’d give webcomics a try.  So, here it is: “In Dreams Darkly.”

The Prayer-Machine.

September 23, 2009

Recently, I had to write a blog post for one of my classes.  The assignment was to “find a piece of old communication technology and pretend you are a misguided archaeologist who has discovered this technology from another civilization.”  Obviously, I had a bit of fun.  And now for my post, recreated in full super 3-D smell-o-vision in Sensurround, the Prayer-Machine:

[Translated into English]

I have recently uncovered a breakthrough find in my old-Earth excavation site.  I am still unraveling the mysteries of my most recent find – an object most fascinating.  Upon first glance, the device seems related to language.  There are a number of buttons located at the front of the device, each one inscribed with a character.  Each button corresponds with a hammer on the inside of the device, which springs forth upon the pressing of the button.  At the tip of each hammer are two similarly corresponding characters to the ones located on each button-face.  As the buttons are pressed, a sliding mechanism at the back of the device slides from right to left.  There are a number of adjustable items upon the sliding mechanism for which I can discern no use.  Several characters appearing on the front buttons also appear in the same order upon the sliding device, implying to me that there is an order to which these characters should be input.  Another curiosity about the device is a small ribbon that is held between the sliding mechanism and the hammers as the buttons are hit.  The ribbon is of two colors, perhaps hinting at further delineation of meaning between characters as is implied by the variations upon the hammers.  It is interesting to me that variations of a written language should be differentiated not only by shape of character, but by the color of the character.  That the color of ribbon struck should be switchable suggests perhaps a secular and non-secular use for each character.
It is for this reason that I have concluded this device to be a prayer-machine.  Thoughts can be fed into the machine, which, by its fantastic sliding mechanism, allows thoughts to flow from mind to fingertips like the ebb and tide of our lives.  Upon reaching the end of the thought, the machine issues forth a ringing sound from a bell inside of the machine.  It is then permissible for the priest or user of the machine to switch the color of the characters, thereby allowing the user to turn his or her thoughts to the divine eye.  As there is nothing physically produced by pressing the characters on the machine, this mentally-centric interpretation is the only reasonable explanation.  The prayer-machine is an oddity of the past that we are pleased to have discovered in the future of today!

I have recently uncovered a breakthrough find in my old-Earth excavation site.  I am still unraveling the mysteries of my most recent find – an object most fascinating.  Upon first glance, the device seems related to language.  There are a number of buttons located at the front of the device, each one inscribed with a character.  Each button corresponds with a hammer on the inside of the device, which springs forth upon the pressing of the button.  At the tip of each hammer are two similarly corresponding characters to the ones located on each button-face.  As the buttons are pressed, a sliding mechanism at the back of the device slides from right to left.  There are a number of adjustable items upon the sliding mechanism for which I can discern no use.  Several characters appearing on the front buttons also appear in the same order upon the sliding device, implying to me that there is an order to which these characters should be input.  Another curiosity about the device is a small ribbon that is held between the sliding mechanism and the hammers as the buttons are hit.  The ribbon is of two colors, perhaps hinting at further delineation of meaning between characters as is implied by the variations upon the hammers.  It is interesting to me that variations of a written language should be differentiated not only by shape of character, but by the color of the character.  That the color of ribbon struck should be switchable suggests perhaps a secular and non-secular use for each character.

It is for this reason that I have concluded this device to be a prayer-machine. Thoughts can be fed into the machine, which, by its fantastic sliding mechanism, allows thoughts to flow from mind to fingertips like the ebb and tide of our lives. Upon reaching the end of the thought, the machine issues forth a ringing sound from a bell inside of the machine. It is then permissible for the priest or user of the machine to switch the color of the characters, thereby allowing the user to turn his or her thoughts to the divine eye. Without this device, the people of old-Earth would not have been able to commune with their God(s). While today we do not rely on such mysticism, this is a clear sign of dependence on technology. If an error occurred in the machine, then the God(s) would not receive the message. Perhaps civilization on old-Earth fell apart as a result of the multitude of errors produced by this machine (as I noted: if prayers are input too quickly, the hammers of the machine jam). As there is nothing physically produced by pressing the characters on the machine, this mentally-centric interpretation is the only reasonable explanation. The prayer-machine is an oddity of the past that we are pleased to have discovered in the future of today!

Listening to: The New School, The Tough Alliance


Library love.

September 15, 2009
Oh library, how I love the little gifts you give me.

Oh library, how I love the little gifts you give me.


Leap of Faith.

September 9, 2009

I had the pleasure today of seeing one of my brother’s stories published on the Hutchinson News website.  He both shot and wrote the story, a story about a man in a tent.  Read it here.  And check out more pictures on his blog!

As for me, I’ve been doing some writing as well.  It would seem that my brother maintained his sanity a little better, though.

också, för de som kan förstå svenska: Jabón Bris.

Listening to: The Whole World And You, Tally Hall


Imperative.

September 8, 2009

I’d blog about it, but no words can really describe it: Get Down Goblin.  Does anyone know where I might find a copy of one of Jan Terri’s albums?  Either High Risk or Baby Blues will do.  Really.  I’ve got to have it.  It’s like crack.

Listening to: Get Down Goblin, Jan Terri


My apartment. And stuff. And things.

September 6, 2009

Finally, a weekend!  How odd, I haven’t had one of these in something like two weeks.  School has consumed me — but in the most excellent of ways.  I’ve a full load of six classes (this including one independent study), all of which are actually quite interesting.  I have also been submitting various works of poetry for publication (and now tingling with anticipation over rejection letters).  Most of my study abroad applications have also been taken care of — hello Uppsala in the Spring!  Eh?  Yeah, I’m excited.  Sadly, this is about as detailed as I can get with most of my school life as of late.  Needless to say: I have been busy.  I did, however, have the chance this Friday to hang out with my high school buddy Kevin and wander about the Iowa City streets on football game day (intense).  I was unfortunately only able to stay for a night, as I had to return to Rock Island to get some things in order.  These things being a record player, assorted DVDs, and my typewriter: all of which I will be bringing back with me to Champaign.  I also searched nearly an hour in vain for my copy of 1984.  On the plus side, I picked up a copies of Ginsberg’s HOWL and de Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater during my brief stay in Iowa City.  I also picked up a sweet new poncho and a pair of goggles.  You know, for skit och fnittar.  Anyhow, I’d like to throw at you some pictures of my new apartment and of myself after a visit to Iowa City this last Friday.  Fun times.